Skip to main content

Menu

Login

Explore more of Isaaffik

Feedback on Helicopter Share in NE-Greenland 2016

03.04.2017
Logistics
By
Egon Frandsen
During 3 weeks in July-August 2016 projects from GEUS, DMI, Nanok and AU shared one helicopter in the area from Kap Moris Jessup in north to Daneborg in south. This share was initiated by Dirk van As from GEUS on the Isaaffik webpage and coordinated by Egon Frandsen from AU in corporation with Polog, which had the contract with Air Greenland. The share project took over the helicopter at Station Nord from a private expedition (Frederik Paulsen) and 8 different projects shared the Helicopter.

Often we put a lot of effort into the planning of some logistic cordination to make science happen and feel happy when the project succed. We have taken this a litle furtur and asked the users/partners in the helicopter share what actual went well and what could be better. From my point of view it is very important to identify where we had the problems and what can be done better next time.

The result was presented at the Logistik Workshop at DTU on October 31 but here you will find more from the feedback than I presented at the Logistik Workshop.

The Plan

 

 

 

 

The Feeback

Main comments on the question:

  • Not enough communication between coordinator, participants, Air Greenland and Polog
  • Lack of scheduled "day off" for the pilot in the last part of the plan.
  • Problems with fuel at Danmarkshavn
  • The overall plan was working because of flexibility between participants and pilot

Main comments on the question:

  • Inflight plan worked very well
  • Outflight plan didn't work so well due to lack of cordination, optimizing and information

Main comments on the question:

  • Some cargo was delayed from Constable Point to Station Nord
  • Some cargo never arrived at Shannon

Main comments on the question:

  • Better if the one who made the plan also cordinate on site
  • The Pilot was great

Main comments on the question:

  • Logistics share project is the way forward in remote Arctic areas

 

 

Close